Eleanor Smeal of the Feminist Majority Foundation and Ryan Grim of The Huffington Post came on Full Court Press this morning to dissect the President’s comments about Attorney General Kamala Harris’ looks.  Smeal says that he shouldn’t have said it, but that there are other issues that are more important.

Grim says: “This flows out of the White House running things with a locker room mentality. (President Obama) is a dude’s dude.”

Both Smeal and Grim agree that the President needs to add more women into his inner circle. Watch their analysis here.

Feminist pornographer Tristan Taormino gave us the low-down this week on what differentiates “feminist porn” from traditional adult films.


Lisa Miller, contributing editor for New York Magazine, joined John Fugelsang on “Viewpoint” yesterday to discuss her latest article, “The Retro Wife.” Miller also weighed in on three high-profile women who have sparked controversy surrounding the role of women in modern society: Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook COO and author of “Lean In,” Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer, and Anne-Marie Slaughter, professor, Princeton University, and author of the controversial article “Why Women Still Can’t Have It All,” published in The Atlantic.
“All three of them are saying you will be a good feminist if you act exactly like I do, if you do this the way I did,” Miller observes. “But Kelly Makino [from Miller’s article] and other women like her don’t have that kind of outsized ambition and they aren’t working on this abstract manifesto template. They’re just real people with real lives and real marriages and real kids, and they need to navigate it on a much more micro level — and on the micro level, it might be easier to just lean out.”

Watch the full interview here.

Lisa Miller, contributing editor for New York Magazine, joined John Fugelsang on “Viewpoint” yesterday to discuss her latest article, “The Retro Wife.” Miller also weighed in on three high-profile women who have sparked controversy surrounding the role of women in modern society: Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook COO and author of “Lean In,” Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer, and Anne-Marie Slaughter, professor, Princeton University, and author of the controversial article “Why Women Still Can’t Have It All,” published in The Atlantic.

“All three of them are saying you will be a good feminist if you act exactly like I do, if you do this the way I did,” Miller observes. “But Kelly Makino [from Miller’s article] and other women like her don’t have that kind of outsized ambition and they aren’t working on this abstract manifesto template. They’re just real people with real lives and real marriages and real kids, and they need to navigate it on a much more micro level — and on the micro level, it might be easier to just lean out.”

Watch the full interview here.

In her latest piece for New York Magazine, Lisa Miller asks a question percolating in the post-Feminine Mystique world: can you be a feminist and a stay-at-home mom?

Miller joins John Fugelsang on “Viewpoint” today at 8e/5p to discuss the answer.

We hate to be the bearers of bad news, but Suzanne “women are waging a war on men" Venker has written another article. This time, she suggests the ladies forge a truce by admitting they’re inferior to men and acting like it:

Just because you make your own money doesn’t mean your guy can’t pay the bill. Just because you value independence doesn’t mean you can’t take your husband’s last name. Just because you can do the same a job a man can do doesn’t mean you need to let him know it.

And that’s not even the worst of it. Our collective reaction:

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If young women aren’t calling themselves feminists, maybe that’s a sign that the movement has succeeded.

Katie Roiphe

Roiphe was on “Joy Behar: Say Anything!” yesterday to discuss her new book “Messy Lives” as well as the legacy of feminism and how young women distance themselves from that identification. She continues:

"Maybe it’s a sign of how much younger women perceive the opportunities available to them, and maybe that’s a good thing. Maybe they don’t feel like they need feminism. … It’s a very radical change. And this social revolution of feminism in the ’70s really achieved so many of its goals - not every single one of them, obviously - but I think we should say it’s great that these young women don’t feel like they need to be feminists."

Watch the full interview here.

What do you think? Has feminism come so far as to be passe, or should young women still be taking up its banner?

Here’s the thing, Republicans. Here’s the real reality of the situation:

Your side is the one trying to limit our access to birth control and abortion (a legal medical procedure).

Your politicians are the ones talking about how girls “rape easy,” and your sainted Ronald Reagan is the one who started the simultaneously racist, sexist and classist myth of the “welfare queen.”

Just this week, one of your own said he supported forcing women to give birth to a rapist’s baby, and your presidential candidate said he would not withdraw his support for him.

You’re the ones pushing the rumor that Obama’s mother was a porn star who gave birth in Kenya.

Your candidate slammed single mothers right in front of the first president ever born to one.

You’re the ones suggesting bills to cut aid to new mothers.

You’re the ones attempting to defund Planned Parenthoods across the country, which primarily serve young women.

You’re the ones voting down bills like the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act and the Violence Against Women Act.

Oh, and you’re the ones trying to kill Obamacare, which insures millions of American women.

So you’ll have to excuse me if I can’t get my hackles raised over a double entendre about voting and sex. If my choice is between a candidate who lets a celebrity make a cutesy video about her first time and a candidate who will not withdraw his endorsement of a man who says rape babies are part of God’s plan, it’s pretty clear who to choose.

Republicans have been hopping on the “Oh, no! Obama mentioned something about vaginas” Sanctimony Pony every chance they get because even they aren’t dense enough not to realize their party platform is inherently anti-woman. They will do whatever they can in order to pivot the conversation away from “women’s bodies should be subservient to their husbands and fertilized eggs” — because they know that both lady parts and lady smarts tremble in fear at the idea of a Romney presidency. And with good reason. As far as I can tell, most Republican politicians actually do hate me and every other liberal woman out there.

As a young woman, my health, reproductive rights and livelihood are directly threatened by a Romney presidency.

Your team is the one waging the War on Women. Trying to get my feathers ruffled because an ad subliminally mentions sex isn’t going to make me forget that.

Setting aside the dated pop culture references, Dowd seems to be under the impression that women are some sort of monolithic hive-brain who are swooning over the archetypical bad boy out of some primitive need to be clubbed over the head and taken care of by their mate … or their elected officials.

Of course, women aren’t part of the Borg, so I can’t speak for all of us, but as a woman my vote is cast not on the basis of which candidate might win in a bar brawl, but who is speaking to the issues in a way that shows they might have at least the slightest insight into the challenges faced by women in America.

I’m tired of rich white men telling me what to do.

Kathleen Turner, re: Romney, on “Joy Behar: Say Anything!” Full video is here.

Catch the rerun today @ 9E/6P — only on Current.