An overwhelming 90 percent of Americans support comprehensive background checks for gun purchases. To the vast majority of the country on both sides of the aisle it makes complete sense: Everyone should be subjected to a background check before purchasing a gun so that the mentally ill and criminals have a harder time getting their hands on lethal weapons.
So when the U.S. Senate defeated the bipartisan gun legislation’s background check amendment for many it was infuriating. If you’re one of those individuals struggling to cope with the news, you’re not alone. 

An overwhelming 90 percent of Americans support comprehensive background checks for gun purchases. To the vast majority of the country on both sides of the aisle it makes complete sense: Everyone should be subjected to a background check before purchasing a gun so that the mentally ill and criminals have a harder time getting their hands on lethal weapons.

So when the U.S. Senate defeated the bipartisan gun legislation’s background check amendment for many it was infuriating. If you’re one of those individuals struggling to cope with the news, you’re not alone. 

The fact that these people are elected to vote on our behalf and this is what they do when 90 percent of America agrees with this? They should all be fired.
Judy Gold, reacting to the news that a lineup of gun control bills, including bipartisan legislation designed to expand background checks, was defeated in the Senate. Not one of the measures received the 60-vote supermajority needed to pass.

After months of turmoil in Washington, the senate has announced they have come to an agreement on guns. The plan expands background checks, including at gun shows. That effectively closes the infamous gun show loophole. Juana Summers from Politico and Michael Shure discuss.

On Tuesday, the “Gang of Eight” senators, four Democrats and four Republicans, announced a proposal to overhaul the immigration system. If all goes as planned in Washington, 11 million immigrants in the United States will have a path to citizenship by the spring. The senators said they would accomplish reform through one big comprehensive measure rather than several smaller pieces. Beyond the remarkable shift in federal policy, just hearing the word “bipartisan” — which seemed unthinkable only a year ago — is striking.

Under the senators’ plan, most illegal immigrants would be able to apply to become permanent residents, a crucial first step toward citizenship. The plan also creates an employment verification system that will prevent identity theft and put an end to hiring unauthorized workers.

As for the Republicans, the cynics among us might say the GOP is finally realizing the obvious: the demographics are not in their favor, and their party risks permanent obsolescence if it can’t tap into support from the Latino community. In the 2012 election, the GOP got a mere 29 percent of the Latino vote, a crushing defeat in a voting block that is expected to double by 2030. So unless Republicans want 2014 and 2016 election results to be like those of 2012, they need to embrace reform.

But despite the newfound flexibility, the “Gang of Eight” pushed to beef up border security in to order to bring the more conservative to the table. And so the path to citizenship for 11 million will happen only if new and tougher enforcement tools are used. Border agents could soon see new technology, including drones. Yes, drones. Plus a nationwide tracking system whose function will be to ensure illegal immigrants leave the country when required.

And in the most controversial element, all of this will need to be certified by a commission of border-state governors, law enforcement officials and community leaders. Some see risks that the success of the entire plan will rest in the hands of politicians like Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer.

President Obama says he likes the Senate blueprint and may very well skip his own proposal and back the “Gang of Eights.” But all of this still has to survive the House, and if Boehner can get his caucus together, it might have a chance. We’ll just have to see what other wonders 2013 has in store for us.

I think Sen. DeMint clearly sees that the tea party is not a growth industry. When Jim DeMint looked around [after the 2012 election], he looked and saw a future where he would be standing by himself very often and likely facing a dwindling, even greater dwindling number of tea party advocates and allies.
Debbie Wasserman Schultz on Jim DeMint’s impending departure and the sad [for them] future of the Tea Party. Watch the full ‘Viewpoint’ interview here.

Does Jim Demint’s departure from the Senate mean the tea party’s giving up on gaining major control in government? 

Watch “The Young Turks” TONIGHT at 7E/4P on Current TV to see Cenk break down the news.

As Bob Dole looked on from his wheelchair, the Senate GOP shot down the United Nation’s Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) treaty, which would grant people with disabilities equal rights in other countries.

“Those opposing the treaty argue that it would then potentially change U.S. law on issues, such as abortion and home schooling.”

Yes, you read that correctly: the GOP is so insensitive that 38 of them refused to sign a treaty on rights for disabled people because it might "violate US sovereignty" or [positively] impact standards for home-schooling disabled children. Or maybe something something abortion something. By the way:

The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities essentially makes the 1990 Americans With Disabilities Act a non-binding international standard. It requires no change to U.S. law.

Why the GOP’s House committee appointments just disappoint 
In the last election, Republicans got roundly panned as the party of angry, old white men — 71 percent of Hispanic voters chose President Obama. So did 93 percent of African-Americans and 55 percent of female voters. So you would think Republicans would finally reach out to women and minorities. But you would be wrong.
Which brings us to our number of the day: 0.
That is the number of women or people of color who will chair a committee in the House of Representatives next year. Somehow, out of 19 chairmanships, every single one had to go to some old or middle-aged white guy.
Just look at some of the new committee leaders: Jeb Hensarling on Financial Services; Ed Royce on Foreign Affairs; Mike McCaul for Homeland Security; and Lamar Smith — who still doesn’t think climate change is caused by human behavior — is now in charge of, you guessed it, the Science Committee.
Wow. You could find more diversity at a Glenn Beck book signing. Way to change your image, guys.

Why the GOP’s House committee appointments just disappoint

In the last election, Republicans got roundly panned as the party of angry, old white men — 71 percent of Hispanic voters chose President Obama. So did 93 percent of African-Americans and 55 percent of female voters. So you would think Republicans would finally reach out to women and minorities. But you would be wrong.

Which brings us to our number of the day: 0.

That is the number of women or people of color who will chair a committee in the House of Representatives next year. Somehow, out of 19 chairmanships, every single one had to go to some old or middle-aged white guy.

Just look at some of the new committee leaders: Jeb Hensarling on Financial Services; Ed Royce on Foreign Affairs; Mike McCaul for Homeland Security; and Lamar Smith — who still doesn’t think climate change is caused by human behavior — is now in charge of, you guessed it, the Science Committee.

Wow. You could find more diversity at a Glenn Beck book signing. Way to change your image, guys.

Pretty hard to fault that statement!

Pretty hard to fault that statement!

(via #MainstreamRevolution)

(via #MainstreamRevolution)