Moms Demand Action is targeting corporations to take responsibility
Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, a nonprofit organization that brings mothers together to fight for common-sense gun laws, recently announced its new campaign to support corporations that have “gun sense” and put pressure on those that don’t. Shannon Watts, founder of Moms Demand Action, describes gun sense as “our common-sense approach to supporting policies and people who understand that while it’s important to respect the Second Amendment, it’s also important to take action to curb the growing epidemic of gun violence in America.”
This new campaign is urging moms in America to support businesses that don’t allow guns in their establishments, don’t sell assault weapons and don’t partner with gun lobby organizations. In addition to supporting businesses that have gun sense, the campaign puts pressure on businesses such as Starbucks, Wal-Mart, Cabela’s and National Car Rental to change their ways. Moms Demand Action enables anyone to reach out via e-mail to specific corporations to either thank them for having gun sense or ask them to start changing their policies and practices.
Next week, Moms Demand Action members will meet with the members of Congress who voted against background checks. They also plan to protest Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, during his visit to New York and will continue to pressure state legislators to repeal laws allowing guns in schools.
Pictured: some of the companies that Moms Demand Action praises and supports.

Moms Demand Action is targeting corporations to take responsibility

Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, a nonprofit organization that brings mothers together to fight for common-sense gun laws, recently announced its new campaign to support corporations that have “gun sense” and put pressure on those that don’t. Shannon Watts, founder of Moms Demand Action, describes gun sense as “our common-sense approach to supporting policies and people who understand that while it’s important to respect the Second Amendment, it’s also important to take action to curb the growing epidemic of gun violence in America.”

This new campaign is urging moms in America to support businesses that don’t allow guns in their establishments, don’t sell assault weapons and don’t partner with gun lobby organizations. In addition to supporting businesses that have gun sense, the campaign puts pressure on businesses such as Starbucks, Wal-Mart, Cabela’s and National Car Rental to change their ways. Moms Demand Action enables anyone to reach out via e-mail to specific corporations to either thank them for having gun sense or ask them to start changing their policies and practices.

Next week, Moms Demand Action members will meet with the members of Congress who voted against background checks. They also plan to protest Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, during his visit to New York and will continue to pressure state legislators to repeal laws allowing guns in schools.

Pictured: some of the companies that Moms Demand Action praises and supports.

Pew Research recently released a poll on the rise of mothers as chief breadwinners in American families. More women are successfully balancing their role the workforce, being married and having children. This shift reflects a changing dynamic in families but has society changed its mind about gender roles? Keli Goff joins us in “The War Room” tonight at 6E/3P to discuss the rise of moneymaking mothers and how it’s affecting their marriages.

Pew Research recently released a poll on the rise of mothers as chief breadwinners in American families. More women are successfully balancing their role the workforce, being married and having children. This shift reflects a changing dynamic in families but has society changed its mind about gender roles? Keli Goff joins us in “The War Room” tonight at 6E/3P to discuss the rise of moneymaking mothers and how it’s affecting their marriages.

Infographic: Facts and figures you need to know about the death penalty




May 1 is International Workers’ Day and workers across the world today are taking to the streets to protest low wages, unfair conditions and rampant unemployment. From Spain (where unemployment is at 27 percent) to Greece (where protests halted ferry service) to Bangladesh (where poor working conditions became painfully evident after a factory recently collapsed and killed more than 400 people): hundreds of thousands across the globe are making their voices heard.
In the United States, May Day demonstrations may be tamer, but the income equality has never been wider.

Every year, ratios are compiled that compare a company CEO’s salary to that of the average company worker. According to the latest data Bloomberg compiled this week, the average ratio across S&P 500 companies is an astonishing 204 to 1. That ratio is up 20 percent since 2009 and, even more startling, it was only 24 to 1 in 1965.
May 1 is International Workers’ Day and workers across the world today are taking to the streets to protest low wages, unfair conditions and rampant unemployment. From Spain (where unemployment is at 27 percent) to Greece (where protests halted ferry service) to Bangladesh (where poor working conditions became painfully evident after a factory recently collapsed and killed more than 400 people): hundreds of thousands across the globe are making their voices heard.

In the United States, May Day demonstrations may be tamer, but the income equality has never been wider.

Every year, ratios are compiled that compare a company CEO’s salary to that of the average company worker. According to the latest data Bloomberg compiled this week, the average ratio across S&P 500 companies is an astonishing 204 to 1. That ratio is up 20 percent since 2009 and, even more startling, it was only 24 to 1 in 1965.

An overwhelming 90 percent of Americans support comprehensive background checks for gun purchases. To the vast majority of the country on both sides of the aisle it makes complete sense: Everyone should be subjected to a background check before purchasing a gun so that the mentally ill and criminals have a harder time getting their hands on lethal weapons.
So when the U.S. Senate defeated the bipartisan gun legislation’s background check amendment for many it was infuriating. If you’re one of those individuals struggling to cope with the news, you’re not alone. 

An overwhelming 90 percent of Americans support comprehensive background checks for gun purchases. To the vast majority of the country on both sides of the aisle it makes complete sense: Everyone should be subjected to a background check before purchasing a gun so that the mentally ill and criminals have a harder time getting their hands on lethal weapons.

So when the U.S. Senate defeated the bipartisan gun legislation’s background check amendment for many it was infuriating. If you’re one of those individuals struggling to cope with the news, you’re not alone. 

An 18-year-old from Sitka, Alaska is suing his state for not taking action on climate change. Watch it here.

An 18-year-old from Sitka, Alaska is suing his state for not taking action on climate change. Watch it here.

The last abortion doctor murdered in America was Dr. George Tiller, in 2009. He was gunned down in a church parking lot in Wichita, Kan. Last week Trust Women opened a new clinic on the very same grounds where Tiller’s clinic used to be.

But meeting the zoning requirements for opening a new clinic wasn’t easy. The Kansas state legislature has passed a number of bills that make it difficult for women’s health clinics to even operate. These Targeted Regulation of Abortion Provider, or TRAP, laws mandate things like exact square footage of janitor closets and locker space for patients. Julie Burkhart, executive director of Trust Women, joins Michael Shure to discuss.

The last abortion doctor murdered in America was Dr. George Tiller, in 2009. He was gunned down in a church parking lot in Wichita, Kan. Last week Trust Women opened a new clinic on the very same grounds where Tiller’s clinic used to be.

But meeting the zoning requirements for opening a new clinic wasn’t easy. The Kansas state legislature has passed a number of bills that make it difficult for women’s health clinics to even operate. These Targeted Regulation of Abortion Provider, or TRAP, laws mandate things like exact square footage of janitor closets and locker space for patients. Julie Burkhart, executive director of Trust Women, joins Michael Shure to discuss.

Sarah Noone and Adam Pratt launched a petition protesting Alabama’s new sex ed law. They joined Michael Shure on “The War Room” to talk about their fight to change things in the Deep South. Watch the young activists smack down homophobia here.

Sarah Noone and Adam Pratt launched a petition protesting Alabama’s new sex ed law. They joined Michael Shure on “The War Room” to talk about their fight to change things in the Deep South. Watch the young activists smack down homophobia here.

Jon Walker, a senior policy analyst for Fire Dog Lake, talks with Michael Shure inside “The War Room” about the growing trend of support for legalizing marijuana.