Climate change scientist and Stanford professor Ken Caldeira came on The Young Turks yesterday to discuss the atmosphere hitting the critical 400 ppm point. Ana Kasparian asked: OK, so what can we do about it as individuals?
Caldeira says: “It’s good to do these things, like try to drive less and to use compact fluorescent light bulbs … but I really think that the most important thing we can do is let our politicians know how we feel. We’re not going to solve this problem by telling people, ‘You can’t plug in your toaster.’’ … Right now, politicians … are more afraid of the fossil fuel lobby than they are afraid of losing votes.”
Watch the full interview here.

Climate change scientist and Stanford professor Ken Caldeira came on The Young Turks yesterday to discuss the atmosphere hitting the critical 400 ppm point. Ana Kasparian asked: OK, so what can we do about it as individuals?

Caldeira says: “It’s good to do these things, like try to drive less and to use compact fluorescent light bulbs … but I really think that the most important thing we can do is let our politicians know how we feel. We’re not going to solve this problem by telling people, ‘You can’t plug in your toaster.’’ … Right now, politicians … are more afraid of the fossil fuel lobby than they are afraid of losing votes.”

Watch the full interview here.

An 18-year-old from Sitka, Alaska is suing his state for not taking action on climate change. Watch it here.

An 18-year-old from Sitka, Alaska is suing his state for not taking action on climate change. Watch it here.

In this “Viewpoint” Web exclusive, science and education activist Zack Kopplin joins Current TV’s John Fugelsang to discuss bills that give climate change denial and creationism a foothold in classrooms and textbooks across the country.
"The Louisiana Science Education Act, which I’ve been fighting, it doesn’t just help deny evolution, it also opens up climate change to attack. … It specifically cites climate change as a controversial theory that needs to be ‘critiqued’ by supplemental materials — it cites evolution and climate change," Kopplin explains.
Kopplin also shares his thoughts on President Obama’s second-term goals when it comes to scientific research and advancement. 
The United States, for once it seems, is coming to a consensus: 91 percent of Democrats, 97 percent of scientists and 43 percent of Republicans say there is solid evidence the earth is warming. But what’s also obvious is that there still climate change deniers crafting our laws (just this week Marco Rubio told Fox and Friends that “the government can’t change the weather”) and alas, Congress probably won’t pass a bill combatting climate change anytime soon.
But there are things President Obama can do alone through the power of executive orders, and he made it clear during Tuesday’s State of the Union address: If you guys won’t do anything about our warming planet, I will.
So what can he actually do? For one, experts say Obama can take 2012′s EPA’s miles-per-gallon standard for U.S cars further, and apply that fuel standard for heavy trucks, too. Experts also say Obama can, through an executive order, expand 2011′s Better Buildings Initiative, which hires workers to refit both private and federal sector buildings to make them more energy efficient. And he can extend 2012′s federal limit on carbon emission for new power plants and make those standards apply to the country’s existing power plants.
But what are limits of those possible executive orders? Are those plans enough to change the course of climate change? Tonight, climate journalist James West joins Michael Shure in “The War Room” to discuss what we can expect from Obama’s global warming plan in the next four years.

The United States, for once it seems, is coming to a consensus: 91 percent of Democrats, 97 percent of scientists and 43 percent of Republicans say there is solid evidence the earth is warming. But what’s also obvious is that there still climate change deniers crafting our laws (just this week Marco Rubio told Fox and Friends that “the government can’t change the weather”) and alas, Congress probably won’t pass a bill combatting climate change anytime soon.

But there are things President Obama can do alone through the power of executive orders, and he made it clear during Tuesday’s State of the Union address: If you guys won’t do anything about our warming planet, I will.

So what can he actually do? For one, experts say Obama can take 2012′s EPA’s miles-per-gallon standard for U.S cars further, and apply that fuel standard for heavy trucks, too. Experts also say Obama can, through an executive order, expand 2011′s Better Buildings Initiative, which hires workers to refit both private and federal sector buildings to make them more energy efficient. And he can extend 2012′s federal limit on carbon emission for new power plants and make those standards apply to the country’s existing power plants.

But what are limits of those possible executive orders? Are those plans enough to change the course of climate change? Tonight, climate journalist James West joins Michael Shure in “The War Room” to discuss what we can expect from Obama’s global warming plan in the next four years.

In the Great Plains, two states are fighting a war over water as drought conditions leave farmers struggling.

Kansas and Nebraska are taking the case to the Supreme Court, which will have to decide whether or not Nebraska is using more than its fair share of water from the Republican River.

The Republican River is a water source that is used to irrigate farmland in three states: Nebraska, Kansas and Colorado. But farmers in Kansas claim that Nebraska farmers are irrigating too much and failing to leave adequate water for Kansas farmers to the south.

The battle over water comes as the entire Midwest region faces continuing drought conditions. The USDA has attributed a decrease in crop production to drought conditions in 2012, and the outlook for 2013 isn’t looking better. Only light snow and rain are forecast, and a lack of heavy precipitation could affect crop production.

(read more @ link)

President Barack Obama has pledged to make climate change a top priority for the next four years, and environmental groups are putting pressure on the president to back up his words with actions. The Sierra Club has approved an action in civil disobedience for the first time in the group’s history.

Bill McKibben on climate change: “It’s a planetary emergency”

Environmentalist and author Bill McKibben joins Jennifer Granholm in “The War Room” to talk about the impact that climate change will have during the president’s second term, and just how much we’re affecting our planet. McKibben explains, “If one degree melts the Arctic, we’re in a world of hurt. This is an emergency now.”

Watch ‘The War Room with Jennifer Granholm’ on Current TV Monday-Thursday nights at 10E/7P and at 6E/3P on Fridays.

What I regard as by far the biggest issue we’re facing - climate change, global warming - was not even discussed in this campaign, and why not? One of the main reasons why not is that the large carbon polluters and their ideological allies have provided funding in both parties.

Al Gore: Big money kept climate change out of the campaign

Watch the full video at the link.

NASA’s James Hansen: Neither party wants to offend the fossil fuel industry by talking about climate change

In 1988, James Hansen warned Congress that there was a “very strong case” that climate change was having a major impact on weather. Hansen, who is still the head of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies, tells Cenk Uygur, “Neither party wants to offend the fossil fuel industry. They want to win the election, and they know the power of the fossil fuel industry. You can’t turn on your television without seeing these advertisements about clean coal, clean tar sands and the claim that there’s more jobs associated with fossil fuels than other industries. That’s of course not true. But they’re hammering that into the voters’ heads.”

Catch ‘The Young Turks’ weekdays at 7E/4P on Current TV.