Guest co-hosts Michael “Epic Politics Man” Shure and Brown University Professor Tricia Rose talk to Dr. Anthony Iton, Senior Vice President of Healthy Communities of the California Endowment, as part of our Currently: Feeding the Need Initiative. Iton says that you can overlay maps that show racial segregation — even decades ago — with life expectancy and see remarkable similarities. “Segregation has not only economic impact but also has profound health impacts that can be manifest in the actual length of people’s lives,” Iton says. Iton’s organization works to help create healthy food alternatives in these neighborhoods in one attempt to reverse that trend. For more go to current.com/currently.

Infographic: The face of the food stamp recipient
(click through for full size)

You might not realize it, but childhood hunger and national security are related. John Fugelsang came on “Full Court Press” to discuss how as part of our ongoing "Feeding the Need" coverage.

If you haven’t read the New York Times’ scathing review of Guy Fieri’s new restaurant, you are missing out on some quality shade-throwing. Remedy the situation immediately and then watch chef Alex Guarnaschelli (a regular “Chopped” judge and executive chef at Butter and The Darby in NYC) dish about it.

Tune in to Current TV from now through the 20th for our continuing "Feeding the Need" coverage, including interviews with celebrity chefs like Alex.

75% of health care costs could be mitigated by simple lifestyle changes

It’s Friday, and that can only mean one thing. Well, ok, it can mean a lot of things. In our case, it means a new episode of “The Gavin Newsom Show,” featuring the intelligent and disarmingly handsome California Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom. Today, as part of our continuing “Feeding the Need” coverage, Newsom talks to an expert about how simple lifestyle changes can benefit you, your wallet, and your planet.

Set your DVR for a new episode of 'The Gavin Newsom Show' tonight at 11PM Pacific time/1 AM Eastern time.

Childhood hunger isn’t just a problem, it is an epidemic. Sadly, it is one that can and should be eradicated in our first world nation. 

Despite our status as a global power, food insecurity is a reality in America for millions of children. The first step to defeating hunger is awareness.

Here are just a few of the things you might not have known about childhood hunger here in the United States. 

  1. 16.2 million children live in households that lack the means to get enough nutritious food on a regular basis. 
  2. Food insecurity is most common in large cities, but still exists in rural areas, suburbs and other outlying areas around large cities — 25 percent of households with children living in large cities are food-insecure.
  3. The typical (median) food-secure household spent 27 percent more for food than the typical food-insecure household of the same size and composition. 
  4. Children who face hunger are more susceptible to obesity and its harmful health consequences as children and as adults. 
  5. 44.7 million Americans used Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) on average per month during FY 2011. This is 4.4 million more participants than FY 2010. Almost half of these are children — 18.5 million American children received SNAP benefits on average each month of 2010. 
  6. Children who regularly do not get enough nutritious food to eat have significantly higher levels of behavioral, emotional and academic problems and tend to be more aggressive and anxious.
  7. Low-income families view cost as the primary barrier to making healthy meals. Eighty-five percent of respondents to a Share Our Strength survey of low-income families said that healthy eating was important to their family. 
  8. Among food-insecure households, 76.5 percent did not use a food pantry at all during the year; 27 percent said there wasn’t a pantry in their community; 15 percent said they didn’t know whether one was available. 
  9. Undernourished children 0 to 3 years of age cannot learn as much, as fast or as well. 
  10. Six out of seven low-income kids who eat a free or reduced-price school lunch during the academic year do not get a free meal during the summer. 
  11. Children who struggle with hunger are sick more often, recover more slowly and are more likely to be hospitalized.
  12. Teens who regularly do not get enough to eat are more likely to be suspended from school and have difficulty getting along with other kids. 
  13. 27 million individuals — including 14 million children — received food from Feeding America food pantries in 2010. 
  14. More than 20 million kids get a free or reduced-price school lunch on an average school day. But only 9.8 million — fewer than half of those kids — get free or reduced-price school breakfast.

Watch Current TV Nov. 13-20 as we tackle hunger, obesity and nutrition in America during our "Feeding the Need" coverage.

This week, Current is kicking off a special “Feeding the Need" campaign that will feature segments on our shows and online about undernutrition and hunger in the United States.

Click here to see more about the campaign and the schedule of on-air segments, which will include interviews with celebrity chefs with tips on healthy eating. We will be posting recipes from these celebrity chefs throughout the campaign, including this one from the Food Network’s Alex Guarnaschelli.

ROASTED BEET AND GINGER SALAD

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds medium to small beets
  • 1 tablespoon Kosher salt 
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon Balsamic vinegar
  • Honey sea salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons freshly grated ginger
  • 25-30 parsley leaves, washed and dried
  • 20-30 small to medium size mint leaves, washed and dried  

Preparation:

Cook the beets: Using a pot large enough to hold all of the beets, fill it ¾ with cold water and add the beets. Season the water generously with salt. Bring the liquid to a gentle simmer. When the beets are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, drain the water and allow them to cool for about 10 minutes. Peel them by “wiping” the skin off with a kitchen towel. Trim the tough parts of the tops and bottoms off with a small knife and cut each beet into “sections” like pieces of an orange.

Make the dressing: In a medium bowl, combine the cider vinegar, Balsamic vinegar, honey and salt and pepper to taste. Stir in the beets. Place the bowl in the refrigerator and allow the beets to marinate in these ingredients for about 10-15 minutes.  

When ready to serve, add the olive oil and ginger. Toss to coat the beets. Use a scissors to “snip” mint leaves over the salad. Serve immediately.

Alex Guarnaschelli will be joining Joy Behar on 'Say Anything!' Thursday at 6E/3P on Current TV.

“Currently: Feeding the Need” is Current TV’s campaign to focus on hunger, nutrition and obesity in America. In this video, Wolfgang Puck spotlights his work with Meal on Wheels over the years, which feeds 1.5 million citizens per year: “I came to this country with not much… And I became successful, so we have to give something back,” Puck says. “Everybody should get a nutritious meal every day. I think that’s really the minimum.”

Editor’s note: This week, Current is kicking off a special “Feeding the Need" campaign that will feature segments on our shows and online about undernutrition and hunger in the United States. Click here to see more about the campaign and the schedule of on-air segments, which will include interviews with celebrity chefs with tips on healthy eating. We will be posting recipes from these celebrity chefs throughout the campaign, including this one from Wolfgang Puck. 

Who says you aren’t a celebrity chef?

Cooking at home not only saves money, but it also leads to healthier eating habits. 

We know not everyone thinks they are a master in the kitchen, but there are plenty of things that even the clumsiest cooks can prepare with just a few staples from your pantry.One of our favorite chefs, Wolfgang Puck, shared his simple and delicious chicken with garlic and parsley from his Wolfgang Puck American Grille in the Borgata Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City. (click through for the recipe!)

Watch Wolfgang Puck talk healthy eating and his passion for Meals on Wheels Tuesday night on ‘The Young Turks' at 7E/4P.

This is today’s exclusive GetGlue sticker for checking in to any show on Current TV. "1,000 Days" is a charity dedicated to advocating childhood nutrition. Much of a child’s future health & development is shaped by the quality of nutrition she receives during her first 1,000 days. Tune in to Current TV Nov. 13-20 to learn more about hunger, nutrition & obesity in America. Find interviews, healthy recipes, and more here.

This is today’s exclusive GetGlue sticker for checking in to any show on Current TV. "1,000 Days" is a charity dedicated to advocating childhood nutrition. Much of a child’s future health & development is shaped by the quality of nutrition she receives during her first 1,000 days. Tune in to Current TV Nov. 13-20 to learn more about hunger, nutrition & obesity in America. Find interviews, healthy recipes, and more here.